Need a base sour recipe

Need help with a recipe? Have leftover ingredients and don't know what to do with them? Post in here! Any of your "tried & true" recipes can go in the recipe database forum.
Post Reply
User avatar
Celiacbrew
Verified User
Verified User
Posts: 668
Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2014 7:08 pm
Name: Mike E.
Location: Dartmouth

Need a base sour recipe

Post by Celiacbrew » Fri Aug 04, 2017 4:17 pm

Hey all,
Anyone have something I can use for a base sour recipe to add fruit to? I am hoping to use kettle souring and no brett. Also if the recipe doesn't use wheat that would be a bonus. I have never tasted a sour beer before so I am pretty open minded. Some of the fruits I am hoping to experiment with are apricots, cranberry, cherry, raspberry, maybe blueberry.
_____________________________________________________________________________________

Mike E.

User avatar
RubberToe
Award Winner 13
Award Winner 13
Posts: 3407
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2011 9:47 am
Name: Rob
Location: Dartmouth
Contact:

Re: Need a base sour recipe

Post by RubberToe » Fri Aug 04, 2017 7:01 pm

For a kettle sour search here for Jimmy's Berliner recipe. I think that would be a pretty good start.
Single Vessel Electric Brewery Build
Sanke Keg Solera Project
Twitter | Flickr Photos (beer and peppers)
On tap at RubberToe's:
2017 Brown Ale, Belgian Dubbel, Belgian Mild, Preachy Keen, Kombucha, Epic Lemonade
In the fermenter:
Lambic, Experiment

User avatar
RubberToe
Award Winner 13
Award Winner 13
Posts: 3407
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2011 9:47 am
Name: Rob
Location: Dartmouth
Contact:

Re: Need a base sour recipe

Post by RubberToe » Fri Aug 04, 2017 7:08 pm

Oops. That one has wheat I think. <- bonehead

Use the same technique with a light pale ale grist.
Single Vessel Electric Brewery Build
Sanke Keg Solera Project
Twitter | Flickr Photos (beer and peppers)
On tap at RubberToe's:
2017 Brown Ale, Belgian Dubbel, Belgian Mild, Preachy Keen, Kombucha, Epic Lemonade
In the fermenter:
Lambic, Experiment

User avatar
Celiacbrew
Verified User
Verified User
Posts: 668
Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2014 7:08 pm
Name: Mike E.
Location: Dartmouth

Re: Need a base sour recipe

Post by Celiacbrew » Fri Aug 04, 2017 7:23 pm

Thanks Rob. Being completely ignorant about sour beers, why do people use high doses of wheat? Am I going to be missing anything by not using it? Any suggested subs if I use a pale ale as my base recipe?
_____________________________________________________________________________________

Mike E.

User avatar
RubberToe
Award Winner 13
Award Winner 13
Posts: 3407
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2011 9:47 am
Name: Rob
Location: Dartmouth
Contact:

Re: Need a base sour recipe

Post by RubberToe » Fri Aug 04, 2017 8:39 pm

Mike, for the most part when people talk sour beers, especially the coveted ones, they're referring to the kind you ferment for a year or more.

Those are usually fermented with a blend of saccharomyces with a combination of lacto, pedio, brett, or others. In that environment the "bugs" take a really long time to digest the carbs and remaining sugars to produce acids and complex flavours.

So most commonly a "base" sour recipe is a basic 70/30 (ballpark) 2row / wheat grist. Unmalted wheat is also used a lot in this context too. It gives more longer chain carbs for the brett and bacteria to go through slowly.

I think a Berlinner Weisse has a lot of wheat just because that's the style! Those beers are very light and low abv so I imagine you get a bit more body with the malted wheat.

Now, there are many other modern incarnations of quick soured / sour mash / kettle soured beer. This creates a completely different product than traditional / long sours. You could make a kettle soured pale ale, APA, IPA, or whatever you can think of. Best bet is to make something from a tried and true recipe for your first time IMHO.

The laco in a quick sour is in a high sugar environment - wort, not fermented beer. It's introduced after the mash and before the boil. The result is usually a one dimensional sour that can get quite sour. Less complexity and usually without the funk from a wild / long sour beer.

If you're interested in brewing sours I recommend the books Wild Brews and American Sour Beers. I've read them both in anticipation of my sour projects. I haven't brewed a kettle sour yet though.... soon.

:cheers:
Single Vessel Electric Brewery Build
Sanke Keg Solera Project
Twitter | Flickr Photos (beer and peppers)
On tap at RubberToe's:
2017 Brown Ale, Belgian Dubbel, Belgian Mild, Preachy Keen, Kombucha, Epic Lemonade
In the fermenter:
Lambic, Experiment

User avatar
MitchK
Verified User
Verified User
Posts: 854
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2015 4:55 pm
Name: Mitchell Kehoe
Location: Okanagan Valley, BC

Re: Need a base sour recipe

Post by MitchK » Mon Aug 07, 2017 7:52 pm

Wheat often helps add body to sours.

I would replace the wheat with some oats since you're looking for lower gluten content.

Maybe 80% pils, 10% vienna, 10% oats, 1.050 OG or so? Not entirely dissimilar to the rare barrel's golden sour base but without the spelt and wheat (and a bit more oats)

User avatar
Celiacbrew
Verified User
Verified User
Posts: 668
Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2014 7:08 pm
Name: Mike E.
Location: Dartmouth

Re: Need a base sour recipe

Post by Celiacbrew » Mon Aug 07, 2017 10:36 pm

Thanks Mitch. What Rob said about pale ales got me thinking that that might be the way to go for me. Im still formulating a plan but I think the oats is a brilliant idea. I will use your suggested recipe for batch 1 and go from there.

From what I'm gathering from blogs etc the sweetness to balance the sour will come the fruit additions so I don't need a lot of character malts to balance things out. Is that the basic idea, balance the sour against fruit like you would maltiness with bitterness in a normal beer?

Any tips on doing this with a Grainfather?
_____________________________________________________________________________________

Mike E.

User avatar
Lisa J
Verified User
Verified User
Posts: 225
Joined: Mon Feb 08, 2016 12:01 pm
Name: Lisa James
Location: Hammonds Plains

Re: Need a base sour recipe

Post by Lisa J » Tue Aug 08, 2017 10:11 am

Mike, we've done several Berliners in the Grainfather, and they turn out beautifully. Jimmy's instructions suggest purging with CO2 to remove the oxygen, but all I have done to date is mashed in, reduced the Grainfather temp to 110F, dropped in a bag of unmilled grain, and covered the surface of the wort with plastic wrap to keep the oxygen out (because I'm lazy and purging with CO2 sounded like work...). I generally leave it for about 36 hours, but you can give it a light stir and check your pH periodically until you hit your target.

Jimmy is a wealth of info on this. He talked me through the first one, and the rest is history. I have a raspberry Berliner on tap now, and we're loving it.
On Tap at The Frisky Lemur Pub: Razzberliner; Pale Ale with Lime; Smashbomb Atomic IPA Clone; Oatmeal Stout
Fermenting/Conditioning/Bottled: Smashbomb IPA; Jack-O-Lemur Pumpkin Spice Ale (bottled)
On Deck: NEIPA; Rye'n'Ginger IPA; Razzberliner; Hefeweizen

Post Reply

Return to “Recipes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], Magpie [Bot], Yandex [Bot] and 1 guest